Posts Tagged ‘RAW’

If you have Microsoft’s OneDrive, you are in luck. You have already been storing your photos there and you have access to them any time, on any device. But nowadays, with ACDSee’s OneDrive integration, you can access your OneDrive photos in ACDSee, and both your originals and any edits you have made in ACDSee will be continuously backed up into the cloud. You can also simultaneously manage your photos across multiple OneDrive accounts, copying and moving them from account to account.

What does this mean? What can you do with this?

Your photo collection can be synced between multiple PCs, meaning your photos are wherever you are. Photos you take on your mobile device and save to your OneDrive will automatically show up in ACDSee on your PC — there is no need to manually import them. In Manage mode, where you can view, organize, and batch edit your photos on a folder to folder basis, OneDrive is now available like any other folder. In the Folder pane, select your OneDrive folder from its location in your folder tree. Your OneDrive contents will now be visible in the File List pane. From here you can take your OneDrive photos in whatever direction you choose. All the power of ACDSee is available to you.

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Perhaps you would like to perform a variety of corrections to a series of photos at once? You can use batch editing to convert formats and color space, correct lighting and color, resize, rename, etc. And if you find a correction configuration or combination that works really well for you, you can save that as a setting for future use.

You can also use Manage mode to organize and search through your OneDrive photos for that one special shot. You can classify your photos using hierarchical keywords, tagging, categorizing, labeling, and rating, to name a few. Add, manage, and edit IPTC metadata. View or assign the locations your images were taken with the Map pane.

If you would like to view your OneDrive photo (or video) collection on a file by file basis in full size, you can open them in View mode. Double-click the image you would like to view in the File List pane of Manage mode and it will automatically open in View mode.

For non-destructive RAW and JPEG image processing, you can open any of these images in Develop mode, if you are using ACDSee Pro or ACDSee Ultimate. You can improve white balance, tone curves, sharpness, lens distortion, reduce noise, lighting with Light EQ, and a variety of other elements of your photos non-destructively.

In Edit mode, you can apply fine-tuned adjustments while being confident that your originals are preserved. In this mode, there are a variety of tools available to you, such as the ability to make selections, add text, watermark, borders, drawings, brushes, blurring, and pixel targeting. Edit mode also has a full set of adjustment tools, like a collection of lighting and exposure tools, advanced color, color balance, clarity, and geometry and flaw removal tools. Most Edit mode tools can be used in combination with the Layered Editor in ACDSee Ultimate to create composites and photo manipulations.

After you have beautified your photos, you may wish to share them. To view your OneDrive options, such as sharing a OneDrive link, you can press Ctrl + right-click an image to display the Windows context menu within ACDSee.

Your photo collection is safe on OneDrive, but what you can do with those photos doesn’t have to stop there. Access your OneDrive folder in Manage mode in your ACDSee application to take your cloud-traveling photos wherever you want them to go.

I’d like to take a quick look at a nifty little feature that was added to ACDSee back around the release of ACDSee 18 and Pro 8, and is also found in Ultimate 8. It’s possible that it could slip under the radar because, unlike other new features, PicaView is not actually visible inside ACDSee. I know, sounds devious. But, in fact, PicaView couldn’t be more transparent. That is, in a way, its function. ACDSee PicaView is a quick file viewer add-on for File Explorer. Well, what the heck does that mean? It means that when you’re browsing away in Windows Explorer and you’re trying to find that one specific file, you’re going to save quite a bit of time.

Before PicaView, I found it particularly bad when I was looking for a certain image, but it was in a folder full of several hundred similar images all taken in the same setting, at the same time. With PicaView, you can simply right-click an image and see a larger version of it in your context menu, reducing the wild goose chase to a very tame duck chase….not even a chase. You just find it. You “catch” the duck before it even started waddling away.

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PicaView will allow you to identify the image you’re looking for without having to launch it in a viewing application. It saves so much time! You can use it on any image file type supported by ACDSee.  This works on RAW files, too. And, in addition to viewing a preview of the image, you can also view the EXIF information.

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Did the flash fire on that pic? Well, let me just check on that. Right-click!

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Why, no. No, it did not. How easy was that?

If I want to launch the image in ACDSee, I just need to click the preview.

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I can also customize the size that the image previews in, what version of the image displays, etc. To reach the options, right-click an image file. At the top of the preview, click ACDSee PicaView | Options. In the Options dialog, you can elect to have it so that when you right-click, your image displays in a sub-menu, rather than the main menu. You can also choose a size for the image preview.

 

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You can also select the Show Original checkbox, and what this does is ensures that even if you’re viewing images that have been edited or developed, you will see a preview of the original.

Lastly, you can toggle the Show EXIF Information checkbox. You would turn off this checkbox if you only wanted to see a preview of the image and didn’t care to see the EXIF info.

And that’s all there is to it. Hope you enjoy this quick previewing feature designed to make life just that little bit easier.

 

The concept behind, or perhaps the need for, Develop mode can be a bit confusing when you’re first getting into processing your digital photos. I know that it wasn’t intuitive for me. But it’s a pretty sweet mode, so it’s worth taking the time to understand its value. So what’s this Develop mode I speak of all about?

When adjusting your images in Develop mode, the original file is never changed. The changes are saved in a separate file, and are applied each time you open the image. This allows for what we call “non-destructive” developing of your images. It is there to ensure that even if you go very far down a path altering an image, that even if you wind up with something you’re unhappy with, you always have the opportunity to start from scratch, as you possess an untouched original.

When you open a developed image in Develop mode, it displays the settings you previously left them at. This allows you to revisit the image at any time to adjust the previous settings.

So what does this mean for saving in Develop mode? When dealing with a RAW image, you make your changes, then click Done. The image’s develop setting are stored in the XMP file of the RAW and in the ACDSee database. If you’re talking encodable files, such as JPEGs, when you develop an image and press Done, the develop settings are stored in an XMP file, and the original and the XMP file are moved to the [Originals] folder. In Manage and View mode, the image with the changes applied is displayed. The develop settings are also stored in the ACDSee  database. Basically, your original is safely preserved and stored with your changes, and your changes are added every time you look at it.

Ok, now that we’ve gone through the concept, let’s put it into practice. So take an image that you think could use some sprucing, and open it in Develop mode. Apply settings to achieve the look you want.

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Now that you’ve got your image just as you want it, press Done. You’ll notice that your options are Save or Save As. Save As means that you save a version of your developed image with a new name or format and switch to the updated image. Maybe you’re generally inclined to play it safe in these cases and use the Save as option. But stay with me on this workflow first. So, press Save. *Cue dramatic music*

But, the next day, you come back to it and … what were you thinking? Your changes do not, er, stand the test of time, and your opinion on them has changed. Well now you’re in trouble, right? The original is gone.

Guess again! The original is preserved. In Manage mode, right-click the image. Go to Process | Restore to Original.

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Et voilà Your original is back, no harm done.

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In Edit mode, your original image is also preserved. However, the difference is that with Developed images, you can remove any of the changes you have made, regardless of the order that you added them. This allows you to avoid having to start from the beginning. In Edit mode, everything you do to an image is done on top of the results of the previous operation. If you added a series of 10 different edits, but wanted to remove the fifth edit, it would be necessary to start from scratch. But Develop mode bypasses the issue of an order of operations. You can even change the settings on individual selective adjustments, like brushes and gradients.

Furthermore, Edit mode is destructive, which means if you edit and save and edit and save and edit and save, each save degrades your image quality. But in Develop, your changes are all applied at the same time — you always start from the original.

What Else Makes Develop Mode Worthwhile?

Develop mode really makes a difference in the context of RAW photos. What is a RAW photo? A RAW image straight from the camera is undeveloped — it is merely sensor data. When you take the picture, the camera records all the light levels on its sensor and writes them to a file. It also writes in metadata from the camera, such as white balance settings. This is the RAW data.

When you shoot JPEGs, the camera takes that RAW sensor data and does develop processing on the image using the current camera settings, such as exposure and white balance, which produces the image that you see on the preview window or on your computer. Like a polaroid camera that produces the decent-looking image out directly from the camera, the develop processing is done in the camera and never needs to be done again.

Develop processing has to be done in order for a RAW file to be viewable. This processing occurs automatically using default settings, (based on the settings that your camera wrote into the RAW file, such as white balance), as ACDSee displays the image on the screen. Develop mode allows you to change and customize that automatically-applied develop processing to whatever you want it to be. So imagine you take a photo with the wrong white balance settings on your camera. If you’re shooting a JPEG, you can improve the image, but no matter what, you started out with a blueish image because of that wrong setting, and your ultimate image is never going to be perfect. However, if you shot the same image as a RAW, you can change the white balance settings in Develop mode and your results will be as though you went back in time and used the correct white balance settings from the beginning. You will get perfect results because you are working with the pre-white balance RAW sensor data.

Opening a RAW image in Edit mode does not do the same as Edit mode opens your RAW image with the RAW processing already applied.

It’s worth noting that if you alter an image in Edit mode first, and then take it into Develop mode, ACDSee will prompt that the edits will be lost. Develop mode needs to work with the original pixels, as opposed to pixels that have had develop processing added to them, and then editing.

Develop mode is also awesome for the advantage of develop presets.